A woman on a mission to read all of the bad literature and snark at it so that it's more bearable for you to read, too.

doctor-harlequin:

courageisthekeytohappiness:

i’m in love with peter pan. 

he also knows about tumblr so he cool

There’s nothing wrong with sex, people.

otherillusions:

claireruns:

thechroniclesofrin:

- Having sex every day. 
- Saving sex for your wedding night. 
- Never having sex.
- Having sex with different people.
- Having sex with one person.
- Having sex with a person of your same gender.
- Loving sex. 
- Hating sex. 
- Being loud. 
- Being quiet.

The only thing wrong with sex?

When it’s not consensual.

Because that’s not sex. That’s rape.

Reblogging again because this post is so important. 

This

(Source: strengthissexy)

shutupnurse:

phantomofthecity:

cicatrici-belle:

How to get away with not drawing the other eye

you just shattered the fourth wall of art

Clever

shutupnurse:

phantomofthecity:

cicatrici-belle:

How to get away with not drawing the other eye

you just shattered the fourth wall of art

Clever

(Source: megustaelheladoylosgatitos)

cracked:

With so much erotic fiction out there, it’s time to get even creative-r.
5 Plot Lines Erotic Novels Desperately Need to Adopt

#5. Allergy Plot Twists
Think about it: Humans are commonly allergic to the hair, saliva, or dander of other mammals, and there’s no reason these allergies wouldn’t also be set off by mystical creatures or shapeshifting humans. Shapeshifters spend a lot of time in the forest, so they’d be covered in pollen half the year as well. Allergy-heartache could even apply to vampires: If you’re an immortal creature that doesn’t breathe or poop or sweat, you don’t have to change your clothes very often, so you’d probably get dusty as hell. “Boy meets girl, girl breaks out in hives” is a romance plot that writes itself. And yet, as an allergy sufferer myself, I can tell you that we’re an unrepresented market in any book genre, let alone erotica.

Read More

cracked:

With so much erotic fiction out there, it’s time to get even creative-r.

5 Plot Lines Erotic Novels Desperately Need to Adopt

#5. Allergy Plot Twists

Think about it: Humans are commonly allergic to the hair, saliva, or dander of other mammals, and there’s no reason these allergies wouldn’t also be set off by mystical creatures or shapeshifting humans. Shapeshifters spend a lot of time in the forest, so they’d be covered in pollen half the year as well. Allergy-heartache could even apply to vampires: If you’re an immortal creature that doesn’t breathe or poop or sweat, you don’t have to change your clothes very often, so you’d probably get dusty as hell. “Boy meets girl, girl breaks out in hives” is a romance plot that writes itself. And yet, as an allergy sufferer myself, I can tell you that we’re an unrepresented market in any book genre, let alone erotica.

Read More

framesjanco:

wine tastes so bad. I’m convinced the whole world is in on an inside joke together trying to persuade me that wine tastes good to them. there’s no way any one can like the taste of it. it’s like bug spray. the whole frickin world pretends to like bug spray. I don’t understand why. stop the madness

Following that new trend

justamerplwithabox:

Type the following words into your tags box, then post the first automatic tag that comes up.

  • really 
  • here
  • actually
  • always
  • oh
  • so
  • this
  • haha
  • am
  • come

smokeuntilmy3eyesbleed:

fucking jon stewart is the man haha

(Source: sandandglass)

Anonymous asked:

Because I just read your first chapter snark for Graceling, and I got a little worried about my own book, when is a character a Mary Sue because of her fighting skills? My MC gets very good and killing and fighting after months of training and situations where she didn't really have much choice, and at the end, it's a skill that's very close to what defines her. Idk, I don't want her to come across as a Mary Sue.

readingwithavengeance:

It’s not fighting skills that make a character a Sue.  It’s not any set of skills that make a character a Sue.  (At least, not to my definition.)

It’s…hard to pin down.  It’s an attitude on the part of the narration.  It’s when the character is the best at everything, experiences no hardships, is miles ahead of the rest of the characters.  It’s when everyone around them is diminished so that the text can say “Mary was unique because everyone else is a slovenly fool while she did everything right.”

It’s all about the context.  If Mary is a half-elf who can fly and fights like it’s a ballet dance, but she’s in a family of half-elves and goes to ballet-fight-school where everyone does that, s’all gravey.  If Mary is a half-elf etc etc, and also she’s got ninja-level sneaking skills, and also she’s super-smart, and also everyone around her trips over their own feet to provide a contrast and highlight how awesome Mary is, well, then there’s a problem.